English News

H-ton Journalism Class Participates in Hofstra Student Press Day

December 19, 2016

H-ton English Honor Society Welcomes New Members

December 7, 2016
Placeholder image

Humanities Chair Joe Leavy Discusses 2016/17 Focus

September 13, 2016
Placeholder image

Huntington Juniors Capture St. Michael’s Book Awards

June 8, 2016

Documents

About

Placeholder image Placeholder image
Teachers and students turned out for the Poetry Slam.

Our students in Huntington live in a world which has witnessed the hopes and fears of the modern age. They live in a community which experiences diversity and opportunity meshed with the naturally concurrent challenges. We educators fully appreciate the importance of guiding our charges in acquiring deeper understandings of our nation’s role in this ever-changing world. We also know that it is incumbent on our students to accept the responsibilities necessary to realize the promise of the American life.

These understandings compel the teachers in the English and Social Studies departments at J. Taylor Finley Middle School and Huntington High School to see their primary objective to be sensitizing students to the multiple viewpoints and historical antecedents which explain the events of our day. We know that reading about the varied human experiences and understandings of the past, as expressed through fiction and the informational writing of others, is the means through which students learn creativity, responsibility and critical thought. It is also understood that history is the school of democracy and literature is a path to the soul. Our teachers are the muses forging the way on these journeys.

In our core courses and electives, students are constantly exposed to essential questions that permeate time and place. The issues, centering on the human experience, are grounded in a thorough study of the facts by means of analysis and interpretation. Research is also a central component to the secondary years of English Language Arts and social studies courses all students are required to satisfactorily complete for graduation.

Leadership

Placeholder image Placeholder image
Joseph Leavy
631-673-2385
jleavy

Joseph Leavy is in his twelfth year as a member of the Huntington School District’s administrative team. He became chairperson of humanities, 7-12 in July 2011. During the previous six years he served as district director of humanities, K-12.

Mr. Leavy began his career in the district in September 1997 as a social studies teacher and has worked at both the middle school and high school levels. He currently supervises secondary grade level English and social studies teachers and the 7-12 curriculum and programs in both academic disciplines.

In addition to teaching AP American History, AP US Government and Politics, Participation in Government, Asian Studies, Economics, Regents level Economics, Global and U.S. History, Global Regents prep and ESL Global 9 classes, Mr. Leavy has served as middle school newspaper club advisor, National History Day coordinator, co-facilitator of the WISE student internship program, class advisor, curriculum writer and author of new course proposals.

Mr. Leavy, who was his high school’s student government president, graduated from St. Pius X Preparatory Seminary in 1984 as class valedictorian. He obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree in history with a minor in philosophy in 1988 from Adelphi, where he also earned also earned a Master of Arts in social studies education in 1991.

Mr. Leavy engaged in private language study of Mandarin Chinese at Fu Ren University in Hsinschuang, Taiwan from September 1993 to June 1994 and later went on to earn a second Master of Arts degree in Chinese studies in 2000 from St. John’s University, where he conducted research into the 19th century Taiping Rebellion. He has served as a Chinese language translator for communications with parents of Huntington students.

Prior to coming to the district, Mr. Leavy taught at St. Thomas the Apostle School and The Windsor School, worked as an instructor in the Hope for Youth at-risk program and in January 1992 became the first American to teach English at Ta Hwa College of Commerce in Hsinchu, Taiwan. He worked there through June 1994.

An admirer of Theodore Roosevelt, Mr. Leavy worked as a tour guide for the National Parks Service at the former president’s home at Sagamore Hill in Oyster Bay. He maintains memberships in a number of historical and professional societies and won the Clio Award from the Phi Alpha Theta Society for “outstanding research” on the role of Ireland’s neutrality in World War II.

Fluent in Mandarin Chinese, Mr. Leavy has traveled extensively throughout Europe and Eastern Europe, Asia and Southeast Asia, including China, Russia and Japan.

Mr. Leavy began participating in a Chinese exchange initiative in 2010 when a group of Huntington students and parents demonstrated a strong interest in engaging in more intense learning about the Chinese language and culture. This led to the establishment of the Asian Studies elective course and toward developing a relationship with Tianjin Number One High School in Tianjin, a city of 10 million inhabitants. This high school is regarded as one of the best in China and Huntington High School has established a sister-school relationship with it.

Huntington families welcomed a delegation of Tianjin students and teachers during the 2011/12 school years. Huntington students visited China for workshops and various additional learning experiences in 2013.

Always hungry for intellectual growth and challenge, Mr. Leavy obtained his administrative certification through SUNY Stony Brook. In 2010 he worked as a summer school principal for Western Suffolk BOCES.

Curriculum

The English Department offers a wide variety of courses which not only meets students’ academic needs, but also encourages them to explore their fields of interest. The program in grades nine, ten, and eleven consists of courses designed to work with students on various language arts skills, from reading comprehension, to literary analysis and research. The curricula in these courses are fully aligned to Common Core State Standards, providing instruction in close reading of fiction and non-fiction texts, making strong evidence based claims, and including a rigorous research and writing regimen. It culminates in a number of highly specialized seminar topics in senior year where students begin to explore personally the broad range of literary genres and themes. All students are required to take a full year of English each of the four years that they attend high school. In senior year, students take the capstone 4th year high school English experience, either the two consecutive 12th grade English Seminars, or AP. All students in English classes complete research projects. Research skills introduced and practiced at each grade level are developmentally appropriate. Eleventh and twelfth grade English students will complete a formal research paper meeting and exceeding the Regents standards. Students compile a cumulative writing folder throughout the four years in HHS.

The three English Department half credit electives are offered in a single semester. These three courses are highly enriching, particularly for students with interests in creative writing, journalism and theatrical performance. Students should check with their guidance counselors for course availability. We urge students and their parents to read course descriptions carefully, taking particular note of prerequisites and objectives.

Grade 9 Grade 10 Grade 11 Grade 12
English 9 Regents
English 9 Honors
English 10 Regents
English 10 Honors
Electives
Journalism
Theatre Arts B: Play in Performance
English 11 Regents
English 11 Honors
AP English Language
Electives
Creative Writing
Journalism
Theatre Arts B: Play in Performance
AP English Lit. & Composition
Choose two 1⁄2 year pairs as indicated below:
Bible Literature / Humanities
Multicultural Lit. / Holocaust in Lit.
Film & Short Story / Sports Lit.
Journalism / Mystery
African Am. Lit. / Holocaust in Lit.
Theatre Arts A / Theatre Arts B
Electives
Creative Writing
Journalism
Theatre Arts B: Play in Performance

FOUNDATIONS (AIS) - Course #116-9, 116-10, 116-11

(1 Year – no Credit) Alternating Days

This course provides academic support for students in grades 9, 10, and 11, who need to meet proficiency in ELA skills and content. The course is designed to enhance skill growth, with a focus on writing, enabling students to achieve on a proficient level on the NYS English Language Arts Regents.

ENGLISH 9 REGENTS - Course #112

(1 Year -1 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 8

This is a challenging course centered around the hero in literature. The aim is to help students develop critical thinking and clear communication. These goals are achieved through intensive class study of demanding selections such as Hamilton’s Mythology, Penguin Classic translation of the Odyssey and a Shakespearean play. There are also numerous supplemental reading assignments from recommended lists. High achievement is expected in all areas but especially in reading comprehension and process writing. There is a departmental medial assessment and final examination. NCAA approved

ENGLISH 9 HONORS - Course #113

(1 Year -1 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Recommended for students of exceptional ability in English.
Prerequisites: Completion of English 8 with a grade of 90 or better and recommendation of English 8 teacher and Chairperson’s approval and consideration of ELA scores and writing samples.

This is the initial course in the program that leads to the Advanced Placement Examination in English. The course theme is the hero and his guest. The aim is to have the student develop critical thinking and clear communication as well as to grasp a sound understanding of mythological, legendary, and Biblical culture and stories as preparation for more thorough understanding of literature. The goals are achieved through the study of The Odyssey, a Shakespearean play, as well as novels, short stories and poems by such authors as Sophocles and Golding. Students write frequently and will receive intensive instruction in spelling, grammar, process writing, and oral presentation. Additionally, numerous critical research assignments are required. There is a departmental medial assessment and final examination. NCAA approved

ENGLISH 10 REGENTS - Course #122

(1 Year -1 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 9

English 10 Regents is a challenging course that focuses on individual identity and crucial decisions. It includes much independent reading and frequent writing assignments. Among the works studied are a Shakespearean play and such novels as The Kite Runner; A Catcher in the Rye; Macbeth and The Lord of the Flies. High achievement is expected in all areas, especially in reading comprehension, critical analysis, and writing. There is a departmental medial assessment and final examination. NCAA approved

ENGLISH 10 HONORS - Course #123

(1 Year -1 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Recommended for students of exceptional ability in English.
Prerequisite: Completion of English 9 Honors with a grade of 85 or better or English 9 Regents with grade of 90 or better, and recommendation of English teacher and Chairperson’s approval and writing sample. This co-requisite is required of any student advancing in level.

This is the second course in the program that leads to the Advanced Placement Examination in English. The theme of the course is The American Experience. The aim is to have the student develop critical thinking and clear communication. The syllabus concentrates on American literature with units on short stories, essays, novels, poetry, and drama. The works of Poe, Hawthorne, Twain, Melville, Thoreau, Miller, Morrison, Hurston, and Monk Kidd are studied. There are frequent compositions to develop organization and clarity. Additionally, research in literary criticism is fundamental to the course. There is a departmental midterm assessment and students will take the Common Core English Regents exam in June as 10th graders. NCAA approved

ENGLISH 11 REGENTS - Course #132

(1 Year -1 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 10

English 11 Regents is a challenging course focusing on American literary greats and the themes of Humanity in Conflict and the American Dream. Research techniques and the research paper are emphasized. High standards of achievement are expected in all areas, particularly in composition. Students read novels such as Othello and The Great Gatsby. A research paper is required. All students having entered Huntington High School as a freshman in 2013 – 2014 are required to take the new Common Core ELA Regents in June 2016. NCAA approved.

ENGLISH 11 HONORS - Course #133

(1 Year -1 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Recommended for students of exceptional ability in English.
Prerequisites: Completion of 10 Honors with a grade of 85 or better OR completion of 10 Regents with grade of 90 or better and recommendation of English teacher and Chairperson’s approval and writing sample. This co-requisite is required of any student advancing in level.

This is the third accelerated course in the program that leads to the Advanced Placement Examination in English Literature and Composition. The syllabus concentrates on English literature organized under four literary genres: The essay, the novel, poetry, and drama. Students read works such as, Canterbury Tales, Paradise Lost, Brave New World, essays, and poetry. There are frequent written assignments supporting the development of critical thinking and clear communication. A major research paper is required. Students are required to take the ELA Regents if they haven’t already done so as sophomores. A midterm and final exam are required. NCAA approved

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION - Course #134

(1 Year -1 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Recommended for students of exceptional ability in English.
Prerequisites: Completion of 10 Honors with a grade of 88 or better OR completion of 10 Regents with grade of 92 or better and recommendation of English teacher and Chairperson’s approval. Students will also submit an academic writing sample for review. (This course is also open to 12th graders, in fulfillment of 12th grade English requirements if students are coming from English 11 Honors)

This college level course features advanced composition and research skills. The syllabus concentrates on English literature, with an emphasis on non-fiction works. Students study a variety of prose pieces to notice variations in style and purpose, ultimately understanding both the implicit and explicit relationships among diction, syntax, tone and content. Through a variety of writing activities, they will apply such conventions and language resources to their own expository, analytical and argumentative writing. Multiple impromptu and formal essays are required. A college level research paper is required. Students must take the Advanced Placement English Language and Composition Examination in May. Students are required to take the ELA Regents, in January, if they haven’t already done so as sophomores. A midterm and final exam are required. NCAA approved

In grade 12, students must complete one credit of English. This requirement can be met by taking: AP English Literature and Composition OR Choosing two of the following 1⁄2 year paired seminar courses (fall and spring pairs). For these pairs, the literature theme focus is on maturity and sensitivity.

ADVANCED PLACEMENT (AP) ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION - Course #135

(1 Year -1 Credit) 5 period weekly
Offered to: Grade 12
Recommended for students of exceptional ability in English.
Prerequisites: Completion of 11 AP with a grade of 85 or higher, completion of 11 Honors with a grade of 88 or better or completion of 11 Regents with a grade of 92, recommendation of English teacher and Chairperson’s approval and writing sample. English Regents Score 85-100.

The curriculum for this course is designed to foster careful reading and analysis of classical and contemporary literature representative of the world literature canon. Students read and research criticism of selected works, and develop their own critical standards for interpreting a variety of literary genres. The challenging reading list includes works by Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, Allende, Nabakov, Achebe, Atwood, and Garcia- Marquez. Through a careful study of schools of literary criticism, students are exposed to the canon debate, and learn to identify major tensions, formalistic elements and archetypes in literature. Students are also trained to view literature from biographical, historical and culturalist lenses. In addition, language usage skills and vocabulary development are integrated into a series of weekly writing workshops. A midterm is administered in January. Students must take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. NCAA approved.

BIBLE LITERATURE - Seminar - Course #161F

(1⁄2 Year - 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11

The Bible Literature focuses on the Bible itself, its history, its authors, literary forms, techniques, the people, and places introduced through the Bible. Stories are approached in terms of plot, characters, setting, and theme. Poetry is analyzed in terms of imagery and parallelism; drama in terms of conflict and character; prophetic literature is studied for the content of the message and for the style of the individual prophet. Wisdom literature is approached from the universality of its themes and imagery. The Gospels, Acts, and Epistles are studied for the diversity of the narrative style, point of view, and purpose. A research paper is required. NCAA approved

HUMANITIES - Seminar - Course #163S

(1⁄2 Year - 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11

The Humanities interrelate literature, drama, art, architecture, music, and the philosophies that unify them. The course is built around such general themes as Love and Hate, Good and Evil, and The Question of Identity. The range of material is from Mesopotamia to the 20th Century, emphasis is placed on student involvement, individually and in small groups, and the skills of reading, writing and speaking. A research paper is required. NCAA approved

MULTICULTURAL LITERATURE - Seminar - Course #171F

(1⁄2 Year - 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11

This course traces and examines literature and cross cultural writers who define their positions in history and society. Roles of African-Americans, Native Americans, Arab-Americans, Asian-Americans and Hispanic-Americans are the focal points. It concentrates on reading various forms of literature which reflect these cultures’ roles, backgrounds, positions and feelings. Gender issues and religious culture are also discussed. Authors such as Amy Tan, Judith Ortiz Cofer, Zora Neale Hurston, and Khaled Hossaini are studied. A research paper is required. NCAA approved

HOLOCAUST IN LITERATURE - Seminar - Course #181S

(1⁄2 Year - 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11

This course involves a multi-disciplinary study of the Holocaust as it relates to racism, prejudice and tolerance. Through the use of literature and historical documents, students comprehend the ramifications of this tragic event as it impacts on the present and future. Works such as The Sunflower and Maus I and II are studied. A term paper and a project are required. NCAA approved

JOURNALISM – Seminar or Elective - Course #162F

(1⁄2 Year- 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11
This course can also be taken as an elective in grades 10 & 11

Journalism is an elective course open to all 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students. Seniors only take the course as a senior seminar. Students contribute to the high school newspaper and share responsibility for its interview, feature writing, problems of the press and a history of journalism. This course is strongly recommended for students on the DISPATCH staff. NCAA approved

MYSTERY LITERATURE - Seminar - Course #173S

(1⁄2 Year - 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11

The course consists of a close reading of a small number of important mystery works. They include The Maltese Falcon; and Then There Were None; Postmortem; a Study in Scarlet, and others. In addition, there is a short story unit, beginning with Edgar Allan Poe’s, “The Murders in the Rue Morgue,” and other titles. Each student must select three other mystery novels; for each he/she submits a written report. A research paper is required. NCAA approved

SPORTS LITERATURE - Seminar - Course #160S

(1⁄2 Year - 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11

The course examines the role of sports in literature and America with a view towards understanding its myth and appeal. Students will study novels, short stories, biographies, autobiographies, poems, essays, and films written and directed by men and women. A research paper is required.

FILM/ SHORT STORY - Seminar - Course #166F

(1⁄2 Year - 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11

Film and Short Story is a thematically focused course pairing leading themes in literature with film. Top films, spanning five decades, noted not only for their cinematic advances but also for their indelible stamp on American culture, are combined with literature that threads a compatible stitch in theme and genre. Discussion and assignments evolve from both the literature and films. Vocabulary study is integrated with each reading selection. A research project is required on an author or film director.

AFRICAN AMERICAN LITERATURE - Seminar - Course #182

(1⁄2 Year - 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11

This interdisciplinary course explores the development of African American identity through social, political, economic, regional, and linguistic lenses. Students will engage in both historical and literary analysis, with an emphasis on addressing contemporary issues within the African American community. (This course is linked with its SS Counterpart-African American Participation in Government) NCAA approved

THEATRE ARTS A: MODERN DRAMA - Seminar - Course #176

(1⁄2 Year -1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11

Modern Drama trains audiences for contemporary theatre. Through the examination of plays and the possibility of attending performances, students are brought to the awareness that audience plays a crucial and critical role in bringing a play to life. A final research project is required. Beginning with the 2015 – 2016 school year, this course is no longer NCAA approved.

THEATRE ARTS B: PLAY IN PERFORMANCE – Seminar - Course #176-B

(1⁄2 Year - 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
NOTE: This course may be taken only once.
Students in grades 10, 11, 12 may take this course as an elective.

This highly popular course develops students’ skills in theatrical performance. Through improvisation and scene work as well as study of theory and utilization of games and exercises, students explore their potentials as actors, gain poise and self-awareness. Students must keep an Actor’s Journal. Students will take children’s theatre scripts off the page and onto the stage. A final project will require students to perform within the school district a performance complete with costume, lighting, set and sound design. The creation of a study guide for intermediate and middle school teachers is also required.

CREATIVE WRITING - Elective - Course #164

(1⁄2 Year - 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Recommended for students who are highly motivated and competent writers.
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 9 and 10

Creative writing is an elective course open to all 11th and 12th grade students. In this course, students explore language as a vehicle of self-expression. It allows the students to experience various forms of writing such as the essay, poetry, short story, children’s story, and one act play as a means of self- expression and awareness. It considers form and style as part of the awareness that varied writing experiences produce. It includes revision, rewriting and self-evaluation. The final examination is a creative writing portfolio, assigned at the beginning of the course. NCAA approved

JOURNALISM – Elective - Course #162F

(1⁄2 Year- 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Prerequisite: Successful completion of English 11
This course can also be taken as an elective in grades 10 & 11

Journalism is an elective course open to all 10th, 11th, and 12th grade students. Seniors only take the course as a senior seminar. Students contribute to the high school newspaper and share responsibility for its interview, feature writing, problems of the press and a history of journalism. This course is strongly recommended for students on the DISPATCH staff. NCAA approved

THEATRE ARTS B: PLAY IN PERFORMANCE – Elective - Course #176-B

(1⁄2 Year - 1⁄2 Credit) 5 periods weekly
Offered to grades: 10, 11, 12
NOTE: This course may be taken only once.
Students in grades 10, 11, 12 may take this course as an elective.

This highly popular course develops students’ skills in theatrical performance. Through improvisation and scene work as well as study of theory and utilization of games and exercises, students explore their potentials as actors, gain poise and self-awareness. Students must keep an Actor’s Journal. Students will take children’s theatre scripts off the page and onto the stage. A final project will require students to perform within the school district a performance complete with costume, lighting, set and sound design. The creation of a study guide for intermediate and middle school teachers is also required.

Reading remediation is offered to all students who score a 2 or lower on the grade 8 ELA test, or who are in danger of failing the English Regents.

READING 9 - Course #107

(1 Year - no Credit) 5 periods weekly

Based upon performance in the previous year’s English classes, students who would benefit from specific instruction in reading, writing and study skills will also take a period of Reading. This will be offered to help students reach toward the higher standard of the All-Regents High School. Students will take this course in addition to English 9.

READING 10 - Course #108

(1 Year - no Credit) 5 periods weekly

Based upon performance in the previous year’s English classes and end of year reading test for grade 9. This will be offered to help students reach toward the higher standard of the All-Regents High School. Students will take this course in addition to English 10.

READING 11 - Course #109

(1 Year - no Credit) 5 periods weekly

Based upon performance in the previous year’s English classes and end of year reading test for grade 10. This will be offered to help students reach the NYS Regents Standards. Students will take this course in addition to English 11.

FOUNDATIONS (AIS) - Course #116-9, 116-10, 116-11

(1 Year – no Credit) Alternating Days

This course provides academic support for students in grades 9, 10, and 11, who need to meet proficiency in ELA skills and content. The course is designed to enhance skill growth, with a focus on writing, enabling students to achieve on a proficient level on the NYS English Language Arts Regents.

READING AND COMPOSITION – Course #180

(1 Year – 1 Credit)

Reading and Composition is a comprehensive curriculum proven to raise reading achievement and writing skills for struggling readers. Designed to accelerate students reading two or more years below grade level toward literacy independence with rigorous, grade-level text, this approach leverages adaptive technology to individualize instruction and provide powerful data for differentiation. The curriculum is filled with engaging, multimedia content-area text as well as literature.

The overall goals of the English program in grades 7 and 8 are linked to the new Common Core Standards for English Language Arts. These College and Career Readiness Anchor Standards focus on developing student skills in reading, writing, language, speaking and listening. As readers, speakers, listeners, and writers, students will use oral and written language that follows the accepted conventions of the English language to acquire, interpret, apply, transmit information, as well as to demonstrate self-expression, judgment, and social communication. Students are expected to be active listeners, readers, and writers, since they are involved in the learning process and responsible for their own learning.

ENGLISH 7 (40 Weeks)

This course is required of all 7th grade students. The curriculum, linked to the Common Core Standards for English Language Arts, focuses on writing and literature both fiction and non-fiction. Curricular modifications have taken place since these new Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts and Literacy have been fully adopted by the NYS Education Department.

The Huntington writing program emphasizes writing as a process, including pre-writing, drafting, revising, and editing. Close reading and writing based claims supported by evidence are recurring foci in 7th grade. Literature study emphasizes reading as a process, including reading for aesthetic and personal response, reading for acquisition and interpretation of information, and reading for critical analysis and evaluation. The course includes a formal introduction of the basic types of literature: the novel, short story, poetry, nonfiction, mythology, and folklore. During the year, students’ proficiency in the standards will be assessed through quarterlies which serve as formative assessments in the early months. There is also an intentional focus on writing conventions taught within the context of authentic student writing. A research-based approach, the Strategic Instructional Model(S.I.M.)isintroduced.

Students will take the NYS 7th Grade English Language Arts CCSS Assessment, administered to all seventh graders in New York Sta te in the spring. The final examination is departmental, based on the English Language Arts assessment.

ENGLISH 8 (40 Weeks)

This course is required of all 8th grade students. The curriculum, linked to the Common Core State Standards for Language Arts, emphasizes reading, writing, listening, and speaking. Curricular modifications have taken place since these Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts and Literacy have been fully adopted by the NYS Education Department.

The literature students read challenges them to continue building their literary skills in responding to literary works of different genres. Students develop greater sophistication in reading and writing skills, and continue the writing process. Close reading and writing based claims supported by evidence are again focused on 8th grade. Parts of speech and increasingly sophisticated grammatical structures are learned and practiced. During the year, students’ proficiency in the standards will be assessed through quarterly exams which serve as benchmarks for student growth in NY State reading and writing performance indicators. Students will take the 8th Grade English Language Arts (CCSS) Assessment, administered to all 8th grade students in New York State in the spring. Students continue preparation for Regents level reading, writing, speaking, listening, and critical thinking. A departmental final exam is administered in June.

Please note: All eligible students for our 9th grade Honors English programs will be recommended by a committee. In determining the best placement for the student, reading level, GPA, State scores, and performance on exams will be reviewed. Students should maintain an average of 90, or better, throughout 8th grade and score a high 3 or 4 on the 8th grade ELA Assessment in May to indicate appropriate placement in 9th grade honors. A prorated scaled score will be determined by the department as the State scores are usually not available until placement has already been established.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE LAB

This course meets on alternate days and is designed to allow students to develop their confidence in English language arts and identify where they need improvement. Specific New York State performance indicators and skills will be focused on for each student through writer and reader workshops. With a focus on comprehension, students’ abilities in reading for information and understanding, literacy response, and critical thinking will be enhanced.

Honor Society

Directory

Last Name First Position Email
Leavy Joseph Chairperson, Humanities
Grofik JoAnn Secretary
Antorino Aimee Huntington High School
Colica Gina Huntington High School
Guarino Bonnie Huntington High School
Kroll Steven Huntington High School
Krycinski Kelly Huntington High School
Lombardi Victoria Huntington High School
Molenko Dianna Huntington High School
Pagano John Huntington High School
Quintero Kelly Huntington High School
Rollo Jennifer Huntington High School
Schwendemann Michael Huntington High School
Biscardi Lauren Finley Middle School
Dimattei Jennifer Finley Middle School
Hudak Alison Finley
McGowen Brendan Finley Middle School
Parris Erica Finley Middle School
Riccoboni Marie Finley Middle School
Schiller Kimberly Finley Middle School

Galleries & Videos