STEM Students Enthusiastic at Invention Convention

STEM School students were enthusiastic at the 2nd annual Invention Convention.

December 02, 2016

The second annual Invention Convention at Jack Abrams STEM Magnet School featured a crowd of 150 and plenty of enthusiastic students eager to demonstrate their fascinating machines.

The sixth graders worked collaboratively with a classmate to bring a new “Rube Goldberg” inspired invention to life. The youngsters were thrilled to bring their machines to life.

“Students were challenged to engineer an invention that incorporated the use of the six basic simple machines,” Principal Donna Moro said. “It was a wonderful evening that celebrated the creative spirit of our students.”

A Pulitzer Prize winning cartoonist best known for his zany invention cartoons, Rube Goldberg earned an undergraduate degree at the University of California at Berkeley in engineering. After he moved to New York from San Francisco and began working for Hearst publications he became known throughout the country. His cartoons frequently depicted complicated machines that performed simple or relatively basic tasks.

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Rube Goldberg was a cartoonist
known for his zany inventions.

Mr. Goldberg is the only person ever to be listed in the Merriam Webster Dictionary as an adjective. It’s believed he created more than 50,000 cartoons before passing away in December 1970.

“Our parent feedback on the night was exactly what we were hoping for,” Ms. Moro said. “They told us they loved the initiative and loved seeing students working collaboratively to build and solve problems. They were impressed with their child’s perseverance when faced with challenges and their excitement and dedication to the task and were proud of their final inventions.”

Students were tasked with using their ingenuity throughout the evening and they exceeded expectations. Folks in attendance found it amazing that regardless of how high the bar was set, the Jack Abrams STEM Magnet School sixth graders managed to clear it.

“It was truly a demonstration of the engineering process at work; identify a problem, research, develop solutions, plan, build and test and evaluate, improve and redesign,” Ms. Moro said. “Our students were even redesigning on the spot to improve their original designs. The future of engineering is bright.”

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STEM School students were enthusiastic at the 2nd annual Invention Convention.
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STEM School students were enthusiastic at the 2nd annual Invention Convention.
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STEM School students were enthusiastic at the 2nd annual Invention Convention.